Colombia Solidarity Campaign

- Fighting for Peace with Justice -

c1.jpg

Issue10 - April - June 2003

Colombia Solidarity No 10

April–June 2003



Venezuela: The Chavista Revolution Advances

Print
Share

Three months ago the Chávez government in Venezuela was under siege by a jubilant opposition which thought it had the whip hand: with big business shut down by a bosses’ lockout, banks closed, massive anti-Chávez demonstrations and cacerolazos (pot-banging protests) every day, overwhelming media hostility and above all, the vital oil industry paralysed, it looked as if the government’s days were numbered. The opposition demanded a referendum to be held in early February to revoke the President’s mandate, and/or intervention under the OAS (Organisation of American States) Democratic Charter; and with support from the US, Spain, Colombia and other countries, they had reason to be optimistic - or so it seemed.

Read more...
 

Reviews: Fact of Fiction?

Print
Share

Degrees of Capture

Did you fondly imagine that there might be some useful research going on in our universities to provide alternatives to the fossil fuels that we all know are responsible for global warming? If so, a new report from Corporate Watch entitled Degrees of Capture* will put you straight. The 32-page report outlines how Britain’s cash-strapped universities have forfeited their independence in order to prise open the corporate purse. How independent can you be faced with a £25 million donation from BP, as Cambridge University was in 2001? (The money was used to open the “BP Institute”). Oil companies now routinely fund university programmes, academic posts, even lecture halls in exchange for influence over what goes on in them. Independent academic research is vital to solve problems like global warming, but big oil companies are finding ways to make sure that research and development does nothing to harm their interests, and that they continue instead to encourage our dependence on climate destroying fossil fuels by using new research to find ways to keep prices down.

The government claims to support the search for alternative sources of energy, yet through publicly-funded research (that means we pay for it) it continues to search for cheaper and more efficient ways of guzzling up the earth’s ever dwindling resources. Not only does this prevent other more useful research taking place, it gives the oil industry the competitive edge over other energy sources which don’t have the funds to tempt our universities into doing their work for them. Fossil fuels will eventually run out - we should be looking for alternatives now, not when it’s too late.

Ruby Cox

* Available from Corporate Watch, 16b Cherwell Street, Oxford 0X4 1BG tel 01865791391
e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
website www.corporatewatch.org.uk

Read more...
 

Turning the Tide

Print
Share

Report from the Turning the Tide: The Growing Resistance to Neoliberalism in Latin America conference, 21-22 February, 2003, New York University, New York City, USA.

Read more...
 

Anti War Protests in Colombia

Print
Share

Anti War Protests

"On Thursday 20 March 150 ECOPETROL (state oil corporation) workers accompanied by union leaders from the CUT and a number of activists held a protest outside the ECO-PETROL offices in Bogotá. They sang and chanted against the Uribe Velez government’s support for the war in Iraq, against US intervention and for peace in our country, and also against Chevron-Texaco taking the gas in the Guajira region of Colombia. US flags were burnt and the traffic held up for a while, before the workers returned to work."

Read more...
 
Page 5 of 5

Featured



London Mining Network

london-mining.jpg

The London Mining Network (LMN) is an alliance of human rights, development and environmental groups. We pledge to expose the role of companies, funders and government in the promotion of unacceptable mining projects.